Shrubs of the Month – August

AUGUST
This selection of shrubs is chosen specifically for the poor, thin, acid soils common on the upper parts of the Howth Penninsula. The two we have selected below are at their best this month.

Perovskia “Blue Spire”

Sometimes called Russian sage, this sub-shrub produces soft grey-green foliage on white stems. The flowers resemble spikes of blue lavender. This variety has larger flower-heads and is an impressive plant, even in winter when bold groups of the white stems make an attractive feature. The deeply cut foliage smells strongly of sage when bruised. The Royal Horticultural Society has given it the Award of Garden Merit (AGM).

 

 

Hoheria sextylosa

 

Autumn Show Schedule

The Howth and Sutton Horticutural Society Autumn Show Schedule is now available for download below. Members will receive their Schedules by post early next week.

Download Autumn Show Schedule 2019

If our shows are to succeed we need the support of our members and the local community, both as exhibitors and visitors. Don’t be reluctant to have a go this year. One entry or more from every member or visitor would guarantee a super show!
Every entry makes a show and there are classes to suit all.

Thank You Members and Friends

We hope you enjoyed browsing the 3 Open Gardens last Saturday afternoon.
An enormous Thank You to the owners – Conall and Nuala, Liam and Miriam, Erica.
And a big Thank You to all who donated to our Hospice buckets.
We raised an amazing €1930, all of which has gone to St Francis Hospice, Raheny.
If you would like to open your garden at a time that suits you, please let us know.

HSHS Members Open Gardens

We are delighted to announce that three of our members will open their gardens to members and friends on Saturday 6th July 2019 between 1pm – and 5pm all in support of St. Francis Hospice, Raheny.

Ardán, Windgate Road, Howth
Stonecrop, Strand Road, Sutton
Elmbridge, Dungriffen Road, Howth

Directions to the 3 gardens will be emailed directly to members on the week of the event. 

The Tansey Open Gardens May 2018

St Anne’s Park Rose Festival

The Rose Festival takes place in St Anne’s Park , Raheny, Dublin 5 on the third weekend of July, annually. The Festival is a mix of food, arts and crafts, music and family fun. The festival is open from 10.00 am to 6.00pm on Saturday 20th and Sunday 21st July 2019. It also has a seated picnic area in front of the music stage. Click below for map of St. Anne’s Park.

St Annes Park Rose Festival

Shrub of the Month – July

JULY
This selection of shrubs is chosen specifically for the poor, thin, acid soils common on the upper parts of the Howth Penninsula. The two we have selected below are at their best this month

Romnea coulteri

The gorgeous fragrant flowers of the tree poppy make it a deserving holder of the Royal Horticultural Society’s prestigious Award of Garden Merit (AGM). Blooming for months on end in summer, it is a beautiful choice for a sunny, protected spot in well-drained soil. Plants can prove tricky to get going as they resent transplanting but once established they will spread rapidly. Protect plants with a dry winter mulch and cut back to a low permanent framework each spring.

Eccremocarpus scaber

The Chilean glory flower is an exotic-looking climber with wiry stems and sparse, dark, evergreen foliage which acts as a perfect backdrop to the bright red, orange or yellow tubular flowers, which appear from early summer into autumn. Its speed of growth provides a useful screen for the bare bases of climbing roses, or to disguise the balding lower areas of conifers. The plants are not hardy but in mild regions they may survive – dying down in winter and reappearing larger and stronger the following year. In very mild, sheltered areas the foliage may remain all winter. Otherwise they should be treated as annuals. The Royal Horticultural Society has given it the Award of Garden Merit (AGM).

Pop up Talk: William Orpen, ‘Trees at Howth’

William Orpen (1878-1931), Trees at Howth.
Photo © National Gallery of Ireland

National Gallery of Ireland, Merrion Square West, Dublin 2
7th June 2019
13.15 – 13.45

Join Frances Coghlan in the National Gallery of Ireland for a free lunchtime talk focusing on William Orpen’s 
Trees at Howth, currently on view in the exhibition Shaping Ireland: Landscapes in Irish Art
The talk is free, but a valid exhibition ticket is required for this date and time.
Meet in the exhibition space

https://www.nationalgallery.ie/whats-on/pop-talk-william-orpen-trees-howth


Flavours of Fingal County Show

The Flavours of Fingal County Show is a two-day event combining the sights and sounds of an agricultural show with an unforgettable food and family fun experience all taking place within the historic walled garden of Newbridge House and Farm, Newbridge Demense, Donabate, County Dublin. 

This year the show is on Saturday 29th and Sunday 30th June 2019, and they have added a horticultural section which everyone is invited to enter.  A great day out and well worth a visit.  For further information see http://www.flavoursoffingal.ie/

http://flavoursoffingal.ie/whats-on/

Shrub of the Month – June

JUNE
This selection of shrubs is chosen specifically for the poor, thin, acid soils common on the upper parts of the Howth Penninsula. The two we have selected below are at their best this month.

Cistus cvs.

It is hard to imagine a plant more deserving of a place in the early summer garden than cistus, or the sun rose. As tulips lose their shape and the apple blossom goes over, cistus comes into flower and, along with peonies, help to bridge the flowering gap until roses begin in earnest in mid-June. And what flowers they are. Single, flat and saucer-shaped, with five thin petals, they are creased like tissue paper when they first unfold and come in either white or shades of pink, depending on the variety. Each lasts for only one day, but the plant is so covered in buds that you can depend on new ones opening daily over at least a three-week period.

There are 20 or so species of cistus, all of which are evergreen shrubs. They come originally from the Canary Islands and countries bordering the Mediterranean. Cistus ladanifer, the gum cistus, is a generally hardy, upright shrub, growing to 2m by 1.5m (6.5ft by 5ft) if planted in a favoured spot, such as a south-facing wall border. Ladanum, a commercially extracted gum, comes from this species. The shoots are sticky and the imposing leaves are dark green and lance-shaped. The flowers, which measure 10cm (4in) across, have yellow stamens in the centre, surrounded by five distinctive, deep crimson-red blotches, which look like dried blood. The flowers are carried singly at the end of sideshoots in May and June.

Plants named Cistus ladanifer in garden centres and catalogues often turn out to be the similar but better-shaped cultivar, ‘Paladin’ or C. ladanifer var. sulcatus (formerly C. palhinhae). C. ladanifer var. albiflorus, which you may come across in specialist catalogues, is a form without the red spots on its petals.

One of the best forms for the non-specialist to try is Cistus x cyprius. This hardy hybrid of C. ladanifer and C. laurifolius is an excellent garden plant. Its flowersare similar to those of C. ladanifer, but they are carried in groups at the end of shoots. The leaves are bright green and aromatic. In time, this rounded shrub will grow to about 2m by 2m (6.5ft by 6.5ft). Cistus x dansereaui is similar to C. x cyprius, but grows to only about 1m high and across, making it ideal for small garden. It also has slightly smaller flowers. There is a form called ‘Decumbens’, which grows to only 60cm (24in), and also one called, variously, C. x dansereaui ‘Albiflorus’ or ‘Portmeirion’.

Sparteum junceum