Frogs in Howth and Sutton

Sutton resident Laura O’Neill is currently pursuing a Masters in Biodiversity and Conservation in Trinity College Dublin and is carrying out a research project investigating the habitats and genetic diversity of frogs in Howth and Sutton. This is a continuation of a project carried out by Meghan Doyle in 2015 which involved some interesting results for frogs in our local area.

Laura wants to find out if any HSHS members currently have frogs, frequently had frogs in the past, or have had recent sightings of frogs in their gardens. This includes frogs of any size, tadpoles and frog spawn. In addition, if frogs are present, is there a pond, waterbody or wetland present in the garden?

If you or anyone you know in the locality are interested in their garden being included in the study, Laura can be contacted by email at loneill8@tcd.ie to discuss this further.
Any information will be beneficial to her project and would be greatly appreciated.

Shrub of the Month – May

MAY
This selection of shrubs is chosen specifically for the poor, thin, acid soils common on the upper parts of the Howth Penninsula. The two we have selected below are at their best this month.

Abutilon vitifolium “Suntense”

Sun-loving shrub,grow against a warm wall for winter protection.

Large blue flowers from May.
Height up to 3 metre

 

 

 

Rosa “Canary Bird”

Rosa xanthina ‘Canary Bird’ is one of the earliest roses to flower in the gardening year. Pale yellow, scented flowers are produced on arching stems in mid-late spring. There is often a second flush of flowers in late summer.

 

A Note from St. Francis Hospice Raheny

On behalf of the patients, staff and volunteers, I would like to thank the members of the Howth and Sutton Horticultural Society for their very generous  donation to our hospice garden. It is much appreciated and will be used wisely. We are putting our thinking hats on about planting something lovely for us all to enjoy for many  seasons ahead.

Your thoughtfulness keeps us all going and the beauty of our garden feeds all our souls.


(Donation from our Spring Show profits)

Shrub of the Month – April

APRIL
This selection of shrubs is chosen specifically for the poor, thin, acid soils common on the upper parts of the Howth Penninsula. The two we have selected below are at their best this month.

Camellia cvs.

As long as they are planted in acid soil, camellias are not difficult to grow, and will even thrive in tricky semi-shaded areas, needing only minimal care once established. Most grow into large shrubs or small trees, but are extremely versatile and can be used as wall shrubs, hedges or superb container specimens.

For centuries, camellias have been popular in Japan and China, as can be seen on many of their works of art. Gardeners in Britain first grew these new plants in the early 18th century and by 1850, the camellia had become a prized ornamental shrub. Victorians loved the formality of the blooms and the elegant nature of the evergreen foliage. But, after the Victorian era, interest in camellias waned. Only in the 1950s did they become fashionable again, helped by the introduction of new varieties and species.

Chaenomeles cvs.

Chaenomeles x superba flowers very heavily and tends to grow wider than it is tall, an advantage when wall trained. A tough and very hardy shrub, popular for late winter and early spring colour in almost any situation in the garden. Plants flower best in full sun, but will give satisfaction in partial shade. ‘Crimson and Gold’ is more compact than other varieties and an excellent for training against a wall. It has very deep red flowers with gold yellow anthers, followed by heavy crops of fragrant fruits.

ISNA Plant Fair – St Annes Park, Raheny

Irish Specialist Nursery Association
Spring Plant Fair
The Red Stables, St Annes Park,
Raheny, Dublin 5
Saturday 23rd March 2019
10am – 4pm

The Irish Specialist Nursery Association will host a spring plant fair at St Annes Park. The ISNA is a new grouping of some of the countries best small and independent nurseries and plant growers, whose aim is to promote the home grown plants produced by its members. For further information visit
https://www.irishspecialistnurseriesassociation.com/

Shrubs of the Month – March

MARCH
This selection of shrubs is chosen specifically for the poor, thin, acid soils common on the upper parts of the Howth Penninsula. The two we have selected below are at their best this month.

Magnolia stellata
Image courtesy of Karl Flynn

Magnolia stellata
This is the smallest magnolia and one of the most popular, growing very slowly into a rounded bush, 3m (10ft) high when mature but still only 1.2-1.5m (4-5ft) after ten years. It is fairly hardy, and frost can damage the grey furry buds and open flowers if they are exposed to morning sunshine. A position with early shade and sun later in the day is best. The beautiful flowers, pure white and lightly scented, open very early and before the leaves, eventually covering a mature shrub for several weeks. Plants tolerate lime, even pure limestone. This is one of the best magnolias for a small garden. The Royal Horticultural Society has given it its prestigious Award of Garden Merit (AGM).

 

Clematis armandii
Image courtesy of Karl Flynn

Clematis armandii

Clematis armandii is a tall climber (9 ft) with long evergreen leaves that are covered with fragrant white flowers in early spring

 

 

AGM 6th February 2019

The Howth and Sutton Horticultural Society Annual General Meeting is on Wednesday 6th February at 8pm in Howth Yacht Club and will be followed by an illustrated talk by Darren Ellis of Birdwatch Ireland entitled “Ireland’s Garden Birds”.

This will be Howth and Sutton Horticultural Society’s 75th Annual General Meeting, so we would like to invite all our members to come and celebrate our 75th birthday with a glass of bubbly and a slice of birthday cake!

Thank you for your continued support of the society. 

Members only event

Shrubs of the Month – February

FEBRUARY
This selection of shrubs is chosen specifically for the poor, thin, acid soils common on the upper parts of the Howth Penninsula. The two we have selected below are at their best this month.

Mahonia japonica
Image courtesy of Karl Flynn

Mahonia japonica

A handsome species from China and Taiwan, although plants are now only found in cultivation, this is one of the most popular winter-flowering evergreen shrubs. It makes a bold, colourful highlight when its remarkable leaves, up to 40cm (16in) long, glow rich reddish-purple in the winter garden, followed before the spring by the long terminal clusters of lemon-yellow blooms which smell of lily-of-the-valley. Plants withstand shade, but need some protection from frost and wind to avoid leaf and bud scorch. Flowers last well in water when cut. The Royal Horticultural Society has given it its prestigious Award of Garden Merit (AGM).

Viburnum x burkwoodii

Also known as X Osmarea burkwoodii, this high-quality shrub is a hybrid between two equally superb species, O. decorus and O. delavay, long cultivated as specimen shrubs and durable hedging. Their hybrid combines all their best qualities dense foliage and bushy growth, making a solid hedge or screen in less exposed gardens. Its attractive dark colouring is ideal as a background, and the white, pretty, jasmine-like flowers have a sweet fragrance that carries for great distances. Protect from cold north-east winds which can scorch the foliage. The Royal Horticultural Society has given it its prestigious Award of Garden Merit (AGM).